Hualapai Nation

 

Water for Grand Canyon West


Grand Canyon West, Hualapai, dnr, Water, Solar, 
      pipeline


BIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF THE

GRAND CANYON WEST WATER DISTRIBUTION PIPELINE

PROJECT, WASTEWATER IMPROVEMENTS, AND POTENTIAL

WELL SITES, HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, ARIZONA

(Click here) for full report

Prepared for and funded by:

The Hualapai Nation

Department of Public Works

PO Box 170

Peach Springs, Arizona 86434

Prepared by:

Bruce Pavlick, MS

February 2010


Water is a scarce natural resource on Arizona's fourth largest Indian reservation. Another function of the Hualapai Water Resources is to develop potential sources of water.

The Lower Colorado office of the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) performed a study in 1996 to investigate the feasibility of getting water to Grand Canyon West (GCW). GCW is the Hualapai’s South Rim of the Grand Canyon. Thousands of visitors, mainly from Las Vegas, tour the Seventh Wonder of the World - the Grand Canyon.

 

Grand Canyon West, Hualapai, dnr, Water, Solar, 
      pipeline 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

West Water Solar Well

 

 

Grand Canyon West, Hualapai, dnr, Water, Solar, 
      pipeline   

  The Hualapai Tribe could:

  (1)    haul water in a tanker which   required a round trip of 60 miles per day;

  (2)    pump water up from the   Colorado River;

  (3)    drill an exploratory well on the   edge of the Grand Canyon; or,

  (4)    extend the polyvinyl pipeline   existing on the west side of the   Reservation.

 

 

Black Canyon Booster Station

 

 

The BOR feasibility study indicated that the extension of the pipeline from West Water to GCW, a distance of 26 miles, would be the most appropriate. The exploratory well was the second alternative.

Water for Grand Canyon West

Water is a scarce natural resource on Arizona's fourth largest Indian reservation. Another function of the Hualapai Water Resources is to develop potential sources of water.

The Lower Colorado office of the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) performed a study in 1996 to investigate the feasibility of getting water to Grand Canyon West (GCW). GCW is the Hualapai’s South Rim of the Grand Canyon. Thousands of visitors, mainly from Las Vegas, tour the Seventh Wonder of the World - the Grand Canyon.

 

Grand Canyon West, Hualapai, dnr, Water, Solar, 
      pipeline

 North Tank Solar Booster Station

 

Grand Canyon West, Hualapai, dnr, Water, Solar, 
      pipeline

New Mud Tank well site that will connect to the West Water Solar Well System, approximately 17 miles away

 

The West Water Solar Water Pipeline was a water development project spanning several years and utilized assistance from various federal sources, the use of several arrays of solar panels provided the energy to pump water from West Water. Hualapai Nation leveraged funding from Department of Energy (DOE), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The solar water pipeline was completed in 1998 and the Hualapai’s claim the longest solar-powered water pipeline in the northern hemisphere. The potable water is stored in a new water tank with a capacity of 240,000 gallons. The water is used to service:

 

(1) wildlife, such as Rocky Mountain elk, desert bighorn sheep, antelope, and mule deer;

(2) livestock, such as cattle and horses;

(3) tribal members residing on the Rim ; and,

(4) visitors at Grand Canyon West.

 

Grand Canyon West, Hualapai, dnr, Water, Solar, 
      pipeline

Ranger Cabin Booster Station

 

The Lower Colorado office of the Bureau of Reclamation also funded an exploratory well near Grand Canyon West.  Water was located at a level of 2,682 feet below the surface. The flow was estimated at 12 gallons per minute.

Currently the Water Resource Program is working on combining water from a new ground water well source (new Mud Tank Well) approximately twenty miles from the West water (solar) well system. The purpose of combining these two well sources is to have water available 24 hours a day. The Mud Tank Well is in close proximity to the electrical grid. The plan is to activate the pumps at Mud Tank when the West water system is not exposed to solar power and push the water to Grand Canyon West (GCW) with propane generation at a point that cannot be overcome by the pump system of the Mud Tank Well. When the West water system is activated by solar sunlight the Mud Tank Well will switch off and the solar system will be the primary source of water during the day.

 

Grand Canyon West, Hualapai, dnr, Water, Solar, 
      pipeline

 Deep Well at 2,875 ft will tie into West Water pipline

 

Grand Canyon West, Hualapai, dnr, Water, Solar, 
      pipeline

240,000 gallon water storage tank at Grand Canyon West receiving water for new Mud Tank Well, West Water Well, and Deep Well at Grand Canyon West

 

At GCW the deep well will be retrofitted with a water softener filtration system, that will be powered by either solar or propane generation. Connected to the filtration system will be a wildlife/cattle drinker to handle the byproduct of filtration. A storage tank will be installed above the Deep Well facility on a small hill and approximately 2.6 miles of 2” polyvinyl pipe will be connected to the tank and tied into the West water distribution line, which feeds the 240,000 gallon water storage tank at GCW.

The gallon per minute (gpm) capabilities of each well would be 20 gpm from Mud Tank, 35 gpm from West water and 12 gpm from the Deep Well, for a combined total of 67 gpm.

Conservative use of each of these facilities reduces potential impacts to ground water aquifers and allows for continued below and above ground water flow to maintain springs, wetlands, riparian habitats in the different watersheds and water for wildlife and cattle.

Grand Canyon West, Hualapai, dnr, Water, Solar, 
      pipeline

 

Grand Canyon West, Hualapai, dnr, Water, Solar, 
      pipeline


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