Hualapai Nation

 

Water Pollution Control and

Water Quality Monitoring



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     The Water Resources Program is responsible for the monitoring of over fifty-six different water sources throughout the reservation of which twelve are ground water wells from depths of 40 feet to 2,875 feet and the remaining forty-four are springs, that seep through the ground to extensive flows of water that run all year round. Access to sites is extremely difficult due to the mountainous terrain and canyon networks. The different sites are accessed by helicopter, riverboat and driving. Most of the spring sites also require extensive hiking to gain access.


      At each of the monitoring sites field water quality parameter tests are taken using Hach portable meters that include: pH, Temperature, Conductivity, Salinity, Total Dissolved Solids, Dissolved Oxygen, Turbidity and Flow measurements if there is significant spring flow. In addition water samples are collected in the field, preserved and transported back to the office for in house laboratory analysis using a Hach DR/820 Colorimeter, of Phosphorous, Nitrite and Nitrate and analyses of E.coli using an Idexx Quanti-tray sealer, model2x and Thermolyne incubation process determining number of wells giving positive reaction per 100 ml sample. At selected springs we may gather water samples and deliver to an environmental laboratory, where Environmental Protection Agency full suite water quality analysis is conducted to verify and ensure that our water quality is within acceptable limits of our water quality standards and used as a quality assurance quality control of our in house laboratory results. Due to the extreme costs of water quality analysis through environmental laboratories, the Water Resources Program has developed Wetland bio-monitoring protocols that incorporate; Spring Ecology Assessment Protocols(SEAP), that are more inclusive and representative of the unique seeps and springs of the arid southwest; in collection of Macroinvertabrate samples to assess the water quality of different spring sources and health of the wetlands, instead of expensive commercial laboratory analyses of the water at the different spring sources.


Tribal Water Quality Assessment Report Template 2015 Clean Water Act Section 106 (Click here)

(EPA region 9 template developed to assist tribes in submitting CWA SECT 106 Water Pollution Control, water quality data in a consistent and uniform manner, reflecting the health of the environment in Indian Country.)

 

Water Quality Narrative Report 2015 (Click here)

(A EPA region 9 template component of the CWA Sect. 106, Water Pollution Control, water quality data submission that is coupled with the above template which also reflects a consistent and uniform reporting format on the health of the environment in Indian Country.)

 

Tribal Water Quality Assessment Report Template 2010 Clean Water Act Section 106 (Click here)

(EPA region 9 template developed to assist tribes in submitting CWA SECT 106 Water Pollution Control, water quality data in a consistent and uniform manner, reflecting the health of the environment in Indian Country.)

 

Water Quality Narrative Report 2010 (Click here)

(A EPA region 9 template component of the CWA Sect. 106, Water Pollution Control, water quality data submission that is coupled with the above template which also reflects a consistent and uniform reporting format on the health of the environment in Indian Country.)

 

Water Quality Standards 2009 (Click here)

(Numeric and narrative water quality standards developed by the Hualapai Tribe that support designated uses of surface water bodies.)

 

Water Quality Assessment Report 305(b) 2009 (Click here)

(A narrative water quality assessment report reflecting the health of State Water Bodies, that is required of states annually and where as tribes are not required to submit such a report; although not required the Hualapai Tribe does submit a 305(b) report every five years.)





 

Water Quality Monitoring



The Water Resources Program is responsible for the monitoring of fifty-six different water sources throughout the reservation of which twelve are ground water wells from depths of 40 feet to 2,875 feet and the remaining forty-four are springs, that seep through the ground to extensive flows of water that run all year round. Access to many of the sites is extremely difficult due to the mountainous terrain and canyon networks. The different sites are accessed by helicopter, riverboat and driving. Most of the spring sites also require extensive hiking to gain access.



At each of the water source sites field parameter water quality tests are taken that include: pH, Temperature, Conductivity, Salinity, Total dissolved solids, dissolved oxygen, Turbidity and flow measurements if there is significant spring flow. On selected springs we may gather water samples and deliver to environmental laboratories where Environmental Protection Agency full suite water quality analysis is conducted to verify and ensure that our water is within our acceptable levels of our water quality standards. Due to the extreme costs of water quality analysis through environmental laboratories, the Water Resources Program has developed draft bio-monitoring protocols where we will gather macro invertabrate samples to assess the water quality of different spring sources and health of wetlands instead of laboratory analysis.





 

SWAPP stands for Source Water Assessment and Protection Program. This program is established to ensure the protection of our drinking water sources,  and develop and implement Best Management Practices for contaminant activities around well areas.

This source water protection plan is intended to meet the requirements of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and the Hualapai Tribe’s Water Resource Program.

The Hualapai Water Resource Program endeavors to protect all drinking water supplies from contamination. A major component of the Source Water Protection Program is termed delineation and assessment. The emphasis of the delineation and assessment report is identifying significant potential contaminant threats to drinking water sources, assessing susceptibility to those threats in order to provide the basis needed to develop a source water protection plan for the Hualapai Tribe.

Delineation is a process whereby areas that contribute water to aquifers or surface waters used for drinking water, called source water protection areas, are identified on a map. Geologic and hydrologic conditions are evaluated in order to delineate source water protection areas. Assessment involves identifying locations or regions in source water protection areas where contaminants may be generated, stored, or transported and then determining the potential for contamination of drinking water by these sources. Delineation and assessment is the foundation of source water protection plans. It is the mechanism with which the Hualapai Tribe can use to protect their drinking water source.
 

On most of the aquifers of tribal lands a Source Water Assessment and Protection (SWAP) study has been conducted which identified Potential Contaminant Activities (PCA) that could potentially contaminate the ground water sources. The Water Resources Program has developed Source Water Assessment Protection Plans (SWAPP's) for almost all aquifers on tribal lands. The SWAPP's will contain the following components:

  • (a) monitoring the ground water,


  • (b) Implement Best Management Practices,


  • (c) Prohibition of Potential Contaminant Activities,


  • (d) Public Education on water protection planning,


  • (e) Protection through Ground Water Ordinance,


  • (f) Conservation measures and


  • (g) Contingency plans in the result of a reduction in water availability or contamination to the public water source.


Most all ground water aquifers of the Hualapai Tribe's lands have been assessed and delineated with protection plans in place and subject to the Hualapai Groundwater Protection Overlay Ordinance.

For further information on the development of this issue;

Please (Click here) for a link to:

HUALAPAI GROUNDWATER PROTECTION OVERLAY ORDINANCE

 


Wetlands Biomoniotoring

Please click on the image to view the Wetlands Biomonitoring page

 

Bio-monitoring Protocols, Wetlands, 
      Eco-systems Assessment Protocols

 

Biomonitoring and Spring Ecosystem Assessment Protocols:


Another main focus of the Water Resources Program is the wetland monitoring program funded by EPA. The plan for the future is to monitor nine of the 27 wetland habitats that have been identified as appropriate for long-term monitoring each year (alternating every three years). In addition to the water quality measurements described above under the Clean Water Act Section 106 water quality monitoring, we implement Biomonitoring Protocols that include macroinvertebrate, fish, herpetofauna and avian monitoring activities. In addition, wetland vegetation is characterized and the entire wetland area is delineated. Indices of wetland health are calculated using methods developed within the Spring Ecosystem Assessment Protocols (SEAP) in association with Dr. Larry Stevens and the Museum of Northern Arizona.

Please click on the links above to view the Biomonitoring and Spring Ecosystem Assessment Protocols

(Please note that the SEAP protocols are located within the Appendix B

section in pages 13 thru 40 of the Biomonitoring Protocols.) 

 

 



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